the avengers

“In for an Interesting Challenge”: Steed vs Dr Campbell in “The Master Minds”

Sir Clive Todd, an important British politician, has been found shot in the head in a safe containing secret documents, which he apparently was helping to steal. Steed and Mrs Peel go to Sir Clive’s house, where he is recuperating from his injuries. Mrs Peel is placed under cover as Sir Clive’s nurse. When Sir Clive finally regains consciousness, Steed and Mrs Peel question him, but he has no memory of the robbery, and his memories of other important things seem to be fuzzy as well.

Steed decides that it would be a good idea to have a psychiatrist examine Sir Clive, to see whether the amnesia is real or a clever cover for illegal activities. The Ministry sends Dr Fergus Campbell to help with the case, and his first interaction with Steed is a testy dick-smacking contest, which is worth reproducing in full:

(more…)

Advertisements

… And Another Thing

In the Season 6 episode, “Have Guns Will Haggle,” Tara King gets caught by the baddies and handcuffed to an ammunition crate.

But first please let us notice that she has a kilt pin on her skirt. (A kilt pin is basically a big honking safety pin, for those who don’t know.)

When Tara gets caught and handcuffed, she does … nothing.

She sits there and waits for Steed to rescue her. She doesn’t even try to remove the kilt pin, never mind use it to pick the lock herself.

Then when Steed arrives, the first thing he does is remove the pin and use it to pick the lock. Damsel rescued!

I’m not even gonna bitch about Tara being passive here, because this is just sloppy, sloppy writing. It’s also an excuse to get that shot of Tara’s legs, with Steed plucking at her skirt, which is kinda gross. It’s a crying shame that the writers and producers of Season 6 had so little respect for their own characters and their own show that they allowed this kind of stuff to go forward.


a version of this post originally appeared on my tumblr

“You’re Pretty Good, for a Girl”: Thoughts on the Subversion of Gendered Tropes in “Warlock”

Storytelling in many ways is simply the repetition and reworking of tropes, some of which have been in circulation as long as humans have been telling stories. The hero and the villain, the beast that must be slain, the damsel in the tower, and many others form the canvas or skeleton upon which new tales are created and fleshed out. One common trope (in modern times, at least) is that of the ambitious, skilled female who wants to join in male activities, only to be ignored or told that she’s not welcome, because she’s a girl. Stories based on this trope usually involve the female having to prove that she’s just as badass, or even more badass, than the males, in order to win their respect, if not admiration. I am here calling this the “you’re pretty good, for a girl” (YPGFG) trope.

YPGFG functions simultaneously as subversion and as reinforcement of traditional gender roles. It is subversive because it allows the female character to assume a putatively “male/masculine” role. However, this subversion ultimately is built on a foundation of male/masculine hegemony, because it makes the degree to which the female is able to enact male/masculine behaviors the degree to which she becomes acceptable and worthy, which in turn depends on the assumption that male/masculine is both the default and the better part.

(more…)

Emma’s Date With George Miles as Critique of Rape Culture in “What the Butler Saw”

 ⊕ Content notice for discussion of sexual assault and mentions of rape

“Emma, Darling, You Look Ravishing”

Secrets have been mysteriously leaking to the opposition, and the primary suspects are all highly placed military officers—a vice admiral in the Royal Navy, a major general in the Royal Army, and a group commander in the Royal Air Force—each with his own potentially exploitable personal weakness. Group Commander George Miles is known as something of a Lothario, so Steed asks Mrs Peel to use her feminine wiles to see whether she can’t worm some information out of him. Mrs Peel obliges, managing to wangle a date with Miles at his home. Steed, meanwhile, goes under cover as Miles’ butler, to see whether he can find any info himself and also to be on hand to protect Mrs Peel in case the date gets ugly.

(more…)

Ableism, Sexism, and Toxic Masculinity: The Intersectional Violence at the Heart of “Noon Doomsday” and Season 6

Another in an occasional series on disability in the Avengers


Recently on social media, I saw a link to a story about comic book author Farida Bedwei, the creator of Karmzah, a superhero with cerebral palsy who derives her powers from her crutches. Ms Bedwei, who herself has cerebral palsy, created Karmzah because she wants to see heroes who are like herself, and to share them with other disabled people. She also wants to use Karmzah as a way to end the stigma over the need for assistive devices such as crutches, which are so vital for disabled people, but the use of which all too often comes with additional costs and frustrations because the world has not been constructed to be accessible to the disabled.

This terrific story about Bedwei’s comic and her crutch-wielding superhero set me thinking about the third act of the Season 6 episode “Noon Doomsday,” in which Tara’s ableist attitude ends up endangering both herself and a crutch-wielding Steed, and how Steed’s adaptability, foresight, and approach towards his temporary disability allow him to defeat the villain and rescue Tara. Further, the ableism of this episode exists in intersection with sexism and toxic masculinity, and the presence of all three of these issues is a direct result of the way Tara’s character and her relationship with Steed was handled by the Season 6 producers in general and by “Noon Doomsday” screenwriter Terry Nation in particular.

(more…)

Nurturing Steed, Part the Second

In my previous post, I discussed some of the ways that Steed nurtures people, with a particular focus on his relationship with Mrs Gale. That Steed would be kind and caring with a woman he loves might seem unsurprising, but what about how he nurtures other people and, in particular, men with whom he interacts, and what does that say about his character?

Scattered throughout the series are several instances of Steed acting in a nurturing way towards men. Steed helps them when they’re injured, and comforts them when they’ve been traumatized, and he does all these things with tenderness and compassion. Many of these examples are things that I’ve briefly noted both here and on my tumblr, but I want to draw them together both to create a more coherent picture of this aspect of Steed’s behavior and personality, and to examine it in more depth.

(more…)

A Little Thing About Steed, Emma, Neurodivergence, and Trusting the Process

Recently my fellow tumblr celluloidbroomcloset made some postings about Steed making models to figure out what’s happening in Winged Avenger, and Emma’s responses to that activity. I followed up with one about him making diagrams in Murder Market, and then the following ideas kinda happened:

Sometimes Steed really needs that hands-on, tactile, kinetic way of solving problems. If we accept my headcanon that Steed is ADHD, he probably has so many different ideas blossoming in his head at once that he can’t corral them without creating something concrete that he can latch his ideas onto. Making the model of the building or graphing the murders is a way for him to streamline his thoughts and get them into some semblance of order. Therefore those methods are necessary for him, even if ultimately they don’t provide the key to solving the case.

I think Emma understands this. Yes, she thinks it’s cute that he builds models and makes graphs, but she’s not mocking him for needing to do that just because she doesn’t. She understands that his brain works differently from hers, and that whereas she can just puzzle stuff out logically in her head, Steed sometimes needs to draw pictures or use tools or make models before he can get to the place that Emma already starts from.

Steed doesn’t feel ashamed of having to make graphs or models as part of settling in to a case, and he’s not wasting time by doing those things. Yes, those activities do take time, and they don’t directly lead to the solution to the case, but if he refused to do them at all because he was worried about it seeming weird or stupid or tangential he’d only make himself miserable and the process would take even longer and be even less productive.

Steed probably doesn’t know that he’s ADHD, because that diagnosis didn’t exist back then. But he does know what he needs to do to solve a problem, so that’s what he does. Emma understands that, and accommodates it. She helps him when she can, but mostly she just sits back and waits for him to be ready to go on to the next step, which she does without impatience and with the presumption of Steed’s competence to know what works best for him. In the meantime, Emma pursues her own leads, knowing that Steed will make his own important contributions to the case in his own way.


originally posted on sparklywaistcoat